Kids are running!

Finisher for his first scored race (1.5 mile)! Kid races are just too cute. She got to race the next weekend. He raced too. These youth races are organized by the New York Road Runners. … [Read more...]

One More Mile and the Cookie’s History!

Establishing healthy habits in kids is no easy task. But it’s more important than ever, considering the gamut of health problems caused by inactivity – from poor mental and emotional resilience to disabling and fatal diseases. Like other families, we’re constantly challenged to stay active. How do we encourage kids to make a habit of integrating movement into daily life, a basic skill that affects so many aspects of mental, emotional and physical well-being? It’s an exercise in creativity to make physical activity routine, while at the same time creating memories and strengthening our relationship with them. And how do you make that habit stick? While we love organized sports, it's a significant commitment. The kids are … [Read more...]

KidLit Review: When the Clock Strikes on Halloween

I was eight when I experienced Halloween for the first time. It was our first year in the US, and my Aunt took me trick-or-treating with my cousins. Remember those costumes in a box, plastic mask on top of the neatly folded outfit underneath? I was Supergirl. When that first door opened and candy dropped into my orange pumpkin basket, the entire scope of my being focused completely on the singular goal of getting and devouring more sugar. As a mom, the thing of wonder Halloween became for me that day is something I enjoy sharing with my kids. Lisa Ferland’s bedtime picture book, When the Clock Strikes on Halloween, brings back those memories. It is Halloween. Mummies and goblins and witches all know it’s a big day, and we follow … [Read more...]

#Scene on the running route #JoggingNYC

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Building Families, Nurturing Communities: The Important Role of Social Workers in Adoption

As families journey through life together they’ll face important, complex questions at each phase. With over a hundred years of experience, it is now an enormous community of birth parents, adoptive parents and families, and adoptees that Monica and her colleagues at Spence-Chapin have nurtured. .. Read the rest of the article on the Spence-Chapin blog, where it was written for Social Workers Month. … [Read more...]

Things I love about winter

After three years back in the Northeast US, I'm basking in the change of seasons. Spring is so hopeful and romantic, brimming with life and new beginnings. Then there's Summer – what’s not to love (so says a Pacific Islander)? And Autumn, charming you senseless with its burnt shades of color and kicking off the onslaught of festivities worldwide. Winter? It took living the past seventeen years in the tropics, without the seasons, to come around to winter’s magic. This year I am all about the dark bleak days of winter and embracing the chill. It’s well into January now, and so far it’s a mild one. But we’re looking at double-header snow systems this coming holiday weekend and I’m crossing my fingers! Photo at Mohonk Mountain Lodge … [Read more...]

The best app for trying different types of meditation – Insight Timer

I tried the gamut of meditation apps, and as a beginner my favorites were Headspace and Calm for their easy to digest introduction to mindfulness meditation. Through both apps' introductory content I was able to sustain a meditation habit for about 20 consecutive days on each one. I was able to see a positive difference. Calm $12.99/month; $4.99/mo for annual subscription of $59.88; or $299 lifetimeHeadspace $12.99/month; $7.99/mo for annual subscription of $95.88; or $399 lifetimeInsight Timer $5/month paid annually Both apps are highly rated and popular, but soon their linear approach, limited offerings and voice acting got boring, and that’s when I found Insight Timer. (I am not affiliated in any way to this app except as a user). … [Read more...]

Moving on and saying goodbye…

She kept us on our toes for six weeks, clocking an impressive array of medical emergencies one after the other. Who knew that heart failure could be so stunning, and tragic, and poignant. I got front row seats to a thoracentesis procedure, where the fluid was sucked out of her lungs through a long needle. I got to sit with the MRI technician at 3 am as he isolated the network of carotid arteries on the screen, searching for the occlusion. I got a crash course in thyroid function and how it slowly but steadily weakened one system after another, the signs flashing by without me recognizing their urgency except in hindsight. She racked up to eleven specialists/teams coordinating her care by the end, with visits nearly every hour 'round the … [Read more...]